How long did it take to build the Great Pyramid?

AFRICAN HISTORY

The oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World and the only one that survives today, the Great Pyramid of Giza was constructed as a tomb for the Egyptian pharaoh Khufu. The precise details regarding the pyramid’s construction remain a mystery, as no written records have been found, but a number of estimates place its completion at sometime between 2560 B.C. and 2540 B.C. The pyramid initially rose about 481 feet, making it the world’s tallest man-made structure for thousands of years until it was surpassed in the early 1300s by England’s Lincoln Cathedral. Due to erosion, the pyramid now stands around 455 feet tall.

Covering an area of 13 acres, the massive monument was designed to align with the points of the compass and built with an estimated 2.3 million stones, each weighing a ton or more on average. The workforce is thought to have consisted of thousands of skilled tradesmen and paid laborers, as opposed to slaves, and estimates suggest the project took about two decades to complete. It’s been speculated that workers created ramps in order to move the stone building blocks into place on the pyramid.

In addition to Khufu’s pyramid, two other large pyramids for pharaohs were erected at the Giza site, one for his son Khafra (it originally stood 471 feet high) and the other for Khafra’s son Menkaure (originally 218 feet high). Khafra’s pyramid complex is home to the famous Great Sphinx statue, which measures 241 feet long and about 66 feet high. Over the ages, all three pyramids have been targeted by grave robbers and much of their exterior white limestone stolen, possibly for use in other building projects.

Spread the love
  • 15
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    15
    Shares
Art and the Fulani/Fulbe People

Art and the Fulani/Fulbe People

Fulani ArtBecause Fulani nomads do not change their fashion as frequently as other sedentary groups, traces of past aesthetic traditions tend to be perceptible in contemporary times. Fulani often entrust members of specialized castes or foreigners with the fabrication...

The Age of Iron in West Africa

The Age of Iron in West Africa

Department of Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, The Metropolitan Museum of Art October 2002 Iron smelting and forging technologies may have existed in West Africa among the Nok culture of Nigeria as early as the sixth century B.C. In the period from 1400 to...

Africans in Ancient Greek Art

Africans in Ancient Greek Art

Tales of Ethiopia as a mythical land at the farthest edges of the earth are recorded in some of the earliest Greek literature of the eighth century B.C., including the epic poems of Homer. Greek gods and heroes, like Menelaos, were believed to have visited this place...

DOWNLOAD OUR BOOKS

×