Portraits of African Leadership

AFRICAN HISTORY, Uncategorized

In Africa, sculptural depictions of rulers and ancestral heroes have served a variety of political, spiritual, and commemorative functions. Passed down along dynastic lines or commissioned by current rulers, such images were often displayed as evidence of pedigree to justify and consolidate power, and sometimes served as conduits for communication between the ancancesters and their living successors. Rulers often utilized the medium of portraiture to present themselves to their subjects, frequently in idealized terms that conveyed their physical, intellectual, and spiritual superiority. Often the very act of commissioning a portrait was an indication of the ruler’s power and dynastic legitimacy that demonstrated the individual’s control over important economic and artistic resources. In some political traditions, it also showed that a ruler had undergone ritual processes of investiture that revealed his or her underlying character and ultimate destiny—features that could then be realized in visual form. Some types of portraiture were not figural at all but evoked the subject metaphorically by portraying a set of personal attributes in visual form. Finally, portraits might serve an honorific purpose, memorializing eminent members of the community.

Commemorative Figure (Lefem)
Commemorative Figure (Lefem)
Standing Male and Female Figures
Standing Male and Figures
Buffalo figure
Buffalo figure
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